Arthurs Seat

arthurs seat, holyrood park, edinburgh
arthurs seat, holyrood park, edinburgh

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arthurs seat, holyrood park, edinburgh

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Arthur's Seat

 

The highest hill in Edinburgh, Scotland is Arthur's Seat (a part of Holyrood Park), which can be seen for miles around. Arthurís Seat, along with Salisbury Crags, provides Edinburgh City with a spectacular background. Holyrood Park is Edinburgh's most untamed and largest open space. It is a place to get away from the cosmopolitan Edinburgh streets and a patch of green within city walls.

With its last eruption approximately over 300 million years ago, Arthur's Seat is considered an extinct or inactive volcano. During that time, with its proximity to the equator, Scotland was an entirely different place.

Clues can be derived from the Holyrood Park rocks on how it was millions of years ago. Arthurís Seat has since eroded and now what remains is less than half of its original size. This allows explorers to walk straight into the core of the volcano and view rocks formed underground.

In the annals of scientific history, Holyrood Park holds a position of honor for it was here in the latter part of the 18th century that geologist, James Hutton, discovered evidence to sustain his theories on the earth and how it works. He concluded that these rocks had been formed through various ways at varying periods of time. His theory was that the earth is ancient and yet is continuously changing. His theories influenced Charles Darwin and other scientists. It has also earned James Hutton the title of 'Father of Modern Geology'.